tiny ideas

I’ve written before about the tiny home idea previously – how it might work, what impacts it would have on a town or city, how if might help various people, etc.

Something occurred to me while going to a student’s house in a mobile home park.  There were several older mobile homes (or manufactured homes, if you will, since they’re not exactly mobile).  As these older models become less livable and their worth diminishes beyond the threshold of acceptability, they would need to be removed.  Why not use that space to install two, three, or four tiny homes?

The tiny home would fit nicely into a mobile home park.  Benefits:

  1. The infrastructure for accommodating movable homes is already there.
    1. The use of numerically numbered houses are already in place, rather than grid street addresses.
    2. Utilities electrical, gas, cable, telecommunications, and plumbing hookups are conclusive to movable homes.
    3. A non-standard placement of buildings already exist (the footprints of mobile homes are often kind of random).
  2. Lots in a mobile home park are for the most part rented, not owned, contributing for lower homeowner costs.
  3. Relocating a tiny home would be simpler in a mobile home park than a normal city street lot, allowing for easier sales and purchases of them.  Allowance could be made for shorter leases if a one-year lease isn’t desirable.
  4. Community centres are often part of a mobile home park, a facility that may be of greater benefit to a tiny home owner than the owner of a full-sized home.
  5. It would not impact the neighbourhood as negatively as the monster home crowd.  That is, not as many NIMBY complaints.

I’m sure I could continue to find reasons that this would be a good fit.  What say you?

architecture on Ritalin

Holy cow.  How true.

This Is Your Brain on Architecture

Sarah Williams Goldhagen presents scientific evidence for why some buildings delight us and others—too many of them—disappoint.

Can anyone design a more depressing looking building?  Maybe Arthur Charles Erickson?  (The University of Lethbridge resembles a prison inside its halls.)  I thought for a moment – “What else has that cold, lonely, depressing look?”  What popped into my mind was Robson Square in Vancouver.  Oh – Mr. Erickson again.

Now, don’t get me wrong – I’m not really into hobbit houses, either.  But surely some warmth can enter architecture, can it not?  We’re creating environments to be in.

my new ribs … and hinge

I posted this yesterday afternoon, then my server hit a snag.  I lost this entry.  I’ll enter it again.  It won’t be as eloquently, wittily, or interestingly put as it was before.

I’ve been back at work on the teardrop trailer (teardrop 1).  Floyd and I looked at length at the ribs I created for the galley hatch several weeks back.  I determined that they weren’t usable.

Read moremy new ribs … and hinge

teardrop 1 electrical panel

The electrical panel is now in.  It somewhat mimics the Sprite’s panel.  It includes a two-way radio (11- & 10-metre band SSB), a stereo with CD player, a solar charge controller with volt & amp display, a 120VAC GFCI plug (15 amperes), a 12VDC / USB plug, and four lighted, coloured switches (for the cooler, water pump, cabinetry lights, and galley lights).  All the electrical guts of the trailer will be directly behind that, accessible through the berth via a sliding panel.

It have started calling it teardrop 1 as it is the first one being built.  I thought of giving it a name but later thought otherwise.

ASET Awards evening

The event is done.  At 4:30, I went down to meet T, C (T’s “old lady”), R, & S (R’s sister).  No one was there.  I wandered back and forth for a while and, eventually, received a text from Tyson.  “on my way”  I said, “I’ll message Randy, see if he needs help with his tie or something.”  Turns out I messaged T instead.  I called R.  “Yup, yup, we’re on our way.”  Everyone was in suits and gowns.

Read moreASET Awards evening

at the hotel in Edmonton

I’m in the hotel room now in Edmonton for the ASET event.  We pulled up to the hotel via the new van’s navigation flawlessly and found that they had valet parking.  The front desk said that parking was $35 per night plus $10 for valet if we should choose, but apparently the payers of the room also covered parking.  Randy’s sister came by car on her own, so her parking was taken care of, too, along with valet service.

I went up to my room after arranging with everyone to meet downstairs at 4:30 in the Ballroom.  I seriously needed a shower.  I used scented antiperspirant, and it bothered me the entire trip and only got worse near the end.  I’ll never do that again!  The room is nice.  There’s one king-size bed, a desk, a chair with table & lamp, & a bureau for the coffee, TV, fridge, safe, and such.  It’s a standard hotel room, I guess, except nicer.  Shampoo, body wash, hand soap, shower soap, face cream, shoe polish stuff, all that.

putting up walls (or, ups and downs)

I’ve completed the walls for the latest project, the teardrop trailer.  Unfortunately, I broke a jigsaw blade and had to go buy some more.  Fortunately, the shop is close.  Unfortunately, those little suckers are expensive.  Fortunately, I get AirMiles.  Unfortunately, I haven’t figured out how to use my AirMiles – just keep collecting them.  Fortunately, however, all my AirMiles points are toward cash value from now on instead of travel / merchandise.  Life is full of ups and downs.

a good measure

My students have been improving considerably.  Two in particular, M & F (no, not Mom & Floyd, but another M & another F!), have caught the I-want-to-learn bug.

M has improved his mathematics skills considerably (among other skills).  It’s not easy to do ‘mental math’ without guidance and practise.  We’re using the practices of 1) using fingers to count, 2) memorization (as in the multiplication table), 3) writing out problems long-hand, and 4) using a calculator for complex calculations or to check one’s work.  Because M is in a Montessori program (and, no, it isn’t just for playschool, preschool, and kindergarten – it’s valid all throughout elementary school and beyond), it involves practical life (understanding everyday activities), sensorial (tactility, sound, vision, etc.), academic (mathematics, language arts, histories, the sciences), and societal (creativity, games, group work, social activity).  It’s not just reading, writing, and ‘rithmatic anymore, folks.  So, part of yesterday’s homework is fractions and their uses.  What’s the good in knowing fractions unless you can use them?  He’s a creative fellow, so he could go on to use this skill in everyday life.

No, he’s not helping me build the trailer.  He’s reading the tape measure in the pictures.

F has improved his reading skills. It started with not knowing the phonics of letters and combinations of letters of the alphabet, having difficulty writing letters in patterns, and knowing sight words.  Now he’s sounding out words he doesn’t know and breezing through those he does.  It’s about not being intimidated by the written word, I think, and he’s come a long way in this.  He says he enjoys writing, so hopefully this will pull him along in the reading thing, too.  Plus, I promised him a prize (a notebook from Korea) if he reads really well – something to shoot for.