new toaster, printer, job

A couple of days ago a few things happened – I bought a new toaster, I found a printer on sale and bought it, and I got an offer for a job and accepted.

First things first – I am now a Drafting Technologist for ISP.  I applied last week, had the first interview earlier this week, a phone call to come in for a second interview on Thursday, and was offered a position during that interview.  I start Monday, Nov. 19, 2018 and will be reviewed after 3 months.

I also got an email from ASET congratulating me on being a Technologist in Training.  Now I must work for two out of the next three and a half years go obtain my C. Tech / C.E.T. designation.

I bought a toaster.  Thanks to Walmart’s Rollback price, I got a Black & Decker toaster for $18.88.  Pretty cheap.  It even has a bagel button.

And, finally, a printer.  I thought I’d drop by the printer / scanner area to try to replace my dead machine.  I was looking at a printer, and a Walmart guy came around and asked, “You’re looking for the one on sale?”  “Uh … yah, I am.”  Eh?  I found a pile of Canon PIXMA MX492 boxes.  I wasn’t expecting to pay $34 though.  I’d be an idiot to not buy it.

Uniden PC-122

I won an auction for a Uniden PC-122 CB/SSB radio.  This is the same radio as the Radio Shack TRC-465.  It’s a solid little radio.  I am thinking that MV can use it when we travel together.  We’re always fighting with battery power and range with some 2-way radios that we have.

For those who don’t know, SSB (Super Side Band, or just Sideband) radio is a type of radio signal that has no carrier wave but sends a signal through pure modulation.  Eh?  Read up if you want.  These radios operate on the same frequencies as regular CB radios, either just above (Upper Side Band) or just below (Lower Side Band).  The upside of SSB is increased range.  The downside is that the receiver cannot lock on to any carrier wave but must adjust their receiving modulation up or down to hone in on the signal.

Earl Grey tea

I shocked the world today.  I walked into Good Earth Coffee House and ordered … “Earl Grey tea, please.”  The server, stunned, just looked at me with wide eyes for 3 or 4 seconds.  I wish I had a body cam.  She turned to her coworker and said, slowly, “Earl Grey tea.”  The coworker widened her eyes.  “Okaayyy.”

I’ve been coming here for several years, on and off, and have always had coffee.  But, once in a while, you have to shock the world.

ASET Mentoring program

I have decided to sign up for ASET’s Mentoring program to fine-tune my skills in my search for employment.  I’ve applied for 41 positions and had 8 interviews.  I’ve reworked my resume a few times and have drafter countless cover letters, some of which I have not sent (like to ISL Engineering, as they adamantly require APEGA membership).  I have been close in a few.  Still, in the six months since convocation, nothing solid.  Getting a little concerned.  So I’m hoping a little guidance from a Mentor will offer some insight.

EDDT is done (pretty much)

Yesterday was my last class in the Engineering Design and Drafting Technologies program.  I handed in my last project at 10pm yesterday evening and went home.  (I made this a bigger font ’cause it’s been a pretty major thing in my life for the past few years.)

I’m sitting at 75.63% (unofficial) in my weakest subject, Process Design, but the Final Project is not marked yet.  We designed oil & gas vessels and pipelines and studied how these systems work.

I have 93.6% in Environmental Systems, my second-most interesting subject.  We studied heat loss & efficiencies, solar, psychrometrics, green building systems, and other environmental systems.  I think I wore out the instructor by asking questions.  The biggest idea I’m taking away from this course is the message the instructor instilled in all of us – that add-on stuff, like solar panels and ground source heat pumps, do not make a building green.  What matters is the design of the building.  The rest is window dressing, for the most part.

I don’t know what I got in Civil Design & Drafting.  It was an interesting but tough course.  We studied subdivision plot plans, Real Property Reports, urban planning, Universal Design, road & lot grading, storm (runoff) & sanitary (poop) sewer utility systems, drainage analysis, and earthworks.  I didn’t do very well in the second-last assignment.  Pretty good in the others.

I’m at 81.92% in Architectural Design III so far, but this doesn’t include the final assignment which hasn’t been graded yet.  This is the commercial architectural course.  I submitted our final drawing yesterday at 4:27pm.  Christoper (a teammate) and I will go through all of our drawings and review the instructor’s markups.  We studied Alberta Building Code (not just Div. B Part 9 as in residential architecture), structural factors, site plans, preliminary floor plans, section views, final floor plans, building science, building cross-sections, specifications, reflected ceiling plans, interior & exterior elevations, interior & exterior renderings, and legends.  Very interesting course – my favourite.  I still have the final exam to write as well.  It’s this coming Wednesday, April 18, 2018.

This is also not a final mark as our final submission is not graded yet, but so far I’ve got 95.91% in Applied Research II.  My team researched Bamboo as a Viable Alternative to Steel Reinforcement in Concrete.  We were awarded the Lethbridge College EDDT submission to the ASET Capstone Project.  We will be in ASET’s magazine publication as a finalist in the next step for the Banff meetings.  …  This just in – we got 23/25 on our Final Presentation, the presentation portion of the Final Project.  The Final Report is yet to be graded.

Hopefully all is well.  I’ve not convocated yet (the college-level word for graduate, I guess).  So it ain’t over just yet.